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Showing posts with label Exhaustion. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Exhaustion. Show all posts

Thursday, 12 September 2019

Yet Another Battle For The Mental Health Community

Yet Another Battle For The Mental Health Community

For those suffering from a mental health condition, everyday life can feel like it's as demanding as much out of you as a head of state. The storm that we call mental fog rolls in, slowing one's ability to think and the ability to perform slows down to a crawl. I'm usually spent before noon. This exhaustion can impact motor coordination and as a result, it can cause one to fumble and struggle with even the simplest of tasks.

For those on the outside looking in, it can appear as though those with mental illness are clumsy and natural underperformers. Sadly, at least in my experience, we can be the brunt of many jokes and sometimes, verbal hostility. I admit, our partners and other loved ones must find this very frustrating living with one who mentally stumbles often.... Trust me, I understand that frustration.

I don't know what your experience is like when mental fog  dominates your mental faculties, but I end up getting just as frustrated as the people around me, its a tough go, trying to figure out where you left your keys or trying to repair something, only to lose track of what the steps are to complete the task. these things frustrate the shit out of me. They also require more energy out of me.

Recommended reading


This rapid burnout is yet another battle for the mental health community because it's a very common symptom the mentally well-minded simply can not see. With all the symptoms of mental disorders being that of neurological origin,  I'm not sure you can get others to understand this illness to a degree that would lend itself to the level of that it understanding requires.

That being said, mental illness and its symptoms, whether you see them or not, are as real as the sun in our skies. It's in our nature to make judgements based on what we are observing in any giving moment however, we all need to ask ourselves, "What Does what I am seeing actually mean?"

Understanding mental illness

If you know someone with mental illness and you see them struggling, its because they are; they are struggling to keep pace with the rest of humanity. So please be kind, they have probably been made fun of because of they efforts to push themselves only to mess up the tasks they are doing, they are tired; tired from being sick, sedated by their medications and tired of the stigma of mental illness.



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You may also enjoy: I am vulnerable: I'm good with that.

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Sunday, 8 September 2019

Reduced To Ash - Mental illness and exhaustion

Reduced To Ash - Mental illness and exhaustion


Personally, I find very little difference between overextending one's self physically and when one exceeds their tolerances mentally. The end result is the same, exhaustion. when one has a mental illness, at least my experience with it, it's rather like setting cardboard on fire with gasoline, the energy it initially produces is very intense, large flames and a lot of heat but is quickly reduced to a pile of ash because all of its energy has been depleted.

Anyone, mental illness or not, who has worked in both physical work environments and ones that require mostly mental processing can tell you that mental exhaustion is more tiring than being physically tired. I have done them both, personally, I'd rather be body tired any day of the week. I believe that being mentally spent is what oftentimes leads to physical injury and impacts how productive one can be.

Those with a mental health condition often tell me how quickly they burn up their mental energy stores; the more symptomatic they are, the faster they seem to arrive at the point where they are running on fumes. We, those with mental illness need help before we reduced to a pile of ash.

Reasons why people with mental illness are easily exhausted

This is vindication for me in a sense because what they describe is very similar to my own experiences with mental illness. An unexpected consequence of this revelation is that it helps me not feel like I'm trying to sleigh this dragon all by myself.

Recommended reading


I tire easily, PTSD can feel like you are running through a battlefield, so much sudden noise and constant stimulations that the heightened startle response is always in the on position. Not only do I have to contend with this, but I am also always on guard for some sort of emergency, part firefighter conditioning, mostly designed so that I can avoid potential death destruction. I don't think I manage another critical incident.


This tendency to be easily exhausted has been known to exacerbate my depression. I was once so full of energy and could take on the world, I loved being busy. Now with fatigue setting in so much sooner, I feel like a burden and rather useless. I do my best to shake these thoughts from my head and remind myself that I am no different than someone else who is sick. Sick people tend to tire easily.

As I continue down my road to mental wellness I remind myself to cut myself some slack. My life might not be what it used to be but nonetheless, I am still alive and because of this fact, I will get to where I need to be.

So, If this sounds like you, keeping going but rest when you need to, you may not be able to do what you once were able to do, but you can still do great things.




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You may also enjoy: Slowly Walking My Way To Mental Wellness.


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Check out my friend's blog here: anewdawnaa.com





Sunday, 11 August 2019

At The Psychiatrist's Office: A matter of the right medication.

At The Psychiatrist's Office: A matter of the right medication.

I First met my psychiatrist last fall and with this introduction came hope and relief that a solution to my PTSD would not be too far down the road. What I didn't know at the time was that the road to mental wellness was much longer, full of obstructions and the road signs weren't all that clear.

Now, nearly a year later, I sit in this quiet and unremarkable waiting room, questioning whether I should stay or say enough is enough and walk out the door. Whenever I walk into the main building of Mental Health and Addictions, I am reminded of just how uncertain my future is. I am but weeks away from being off work for  year. Sadly, I can still see the street sign that says "The Road To Mental Wellness" on it. that's how far I have made it in a year.

I'm way too unsettled to remain seated; I'm currently in the throes of a major depressive episode, so I'm emotionally unimpressed by, well, everything really and now that I am alone with question to which I have no answers, I find myself burning a strip back and forth of the floor in the lobby, pacing and thinking, thinking and more pacing.

Finally, I remind myself that I started this mental journey for many reasons, my kids, wider family and my partner being but a few of them. I decide that it is best to stick with my "do whatever it takes" Mantra and wait till the psychiatrist comes and gets me.

While in the appointment, I explain that the new meds are as insufficient as the ones tried previously, that I have been getting two or three hours of sleep a night and my depression is at a level eight for the last week and a half; Likely brought on by the nightmares, that have made it their mission to end R.E.M. sleep prematurely and thus keeping me from getting the deep rest I need.

Need help to asking your Psychiatrist about your depression? Questions about depression

After providing her with a lengthy update, she writes out yet another prescription and hands it to me. I explain to her that after a year of pharmaceutical experimentation, I am not overly optimistic about how effective this latest round will be; I'm reassured that we will keep trying if it yields no real results.

When I walked away, I felt better knowing that I didn't give in to the voice of mental illness, crumble under the weight of exhaustion and give up. Being a mental health warrior means, like that of any other type of warrior, there will be times when we want to give up, but we know we can't, the consequences are too dire to wave the white flag and surrender. We got this!





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